Really? ALL tweets?

Not everyone would think that the actor Ashton Kutcher’s Twitter musings on his daily doings constitute part of “the universal body of human knowledge.”

But the Library of Congress, the 210-year-old guardian of knowledge and cultural history, thinks so.

The library will archive the collected works of Twitter, the blogging service, whose users currently send a daily flood of 55 million messages, all that contain 140 or fewer characters.

Library officials explained the agreement as another step in the library’s embrace of digital media. Twitter, the Silicon Valley start-up, declared it “very exciting that tweets are becoming part of history.”

They’re archiving ALL tweets as of, well now. The Library of Congress has acquired (via donation) every public tweet since Twitter’s inception in March 2006 and will digitally archive those tweets going forward.

Ashton Kutcher’s tweets aside (who has 4,786,276 followers by the way and is listed 36,393 times), here’s an example of the type of crap that the LOC is deeming “historic” and worth saving — http://twitpic.com/1di70g – Super Dave The Wonder Dog — International Dog of Mystery. Here’s another gem: http://twitpic.com/1di7y5 – He cracks me up.

Maybe they should consider every other tweet instead?

Anyway, you can read more of my incredibly interesting and historic tweets by following me on Twitter @thomkell. Enjoy!

Meanwhile, you can read the entire New York Times article by Steve Lohr here.

About Thomas Kelleher

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